Health With a Capital H

Conversations and Community: The Human Touch

November 29, 2011

By Sarah Byrnes, Senior Health Communications Associate

Social Media

An astounding 97 percent of nonprofit organizations use some form of social media, although many still struggle to understand how to use it effectively. A recent expert panel hosted by the Communications department at my alma mater Johns Hopkins University—Communicating Causes: How nonprofits are using social media—discussed how nonprofits, large or small, can maximize their social media use to increase engagement with their cause. The panelists didn’t talk up the latest social media platform or focus much on the go-mobile movement or fawn over viral marketing (“If someone promises to make your campaign viral, fire them.”). Instead, they reminded us that successful social media is about conversations, community, and the human element.

The panel, held on November 17, featured some of DC’s leaders in cause marketing (there were some last-minute changes to the panel thanks to local DC traffic):

Join the Conversation

The panel began with one simple premise: Social media starts with conversation. It’s about listening to the conversation, contributing something of value, and/or starting your own conversations. No matter what your issue, cause, or interest is, you have supporters—you just need to find them. And when you find that community, engage them with dialogue that is authentic and relatable and show a sense of humor. In other words, be human. And be original.

Success will be knocking at your door sooner than you think.

Unfortunately, there is a lot of duplication of messaging in social media (retweeting is an epidemic!). Social media is a place to be creative. Users that contribute fresh content appear more engaged and will be more successful in “influencing the grass tops as opposed to the grass roots.” And as long as you are keeping your organization’s or campaign’s goals in mind, you should never be afraid to fail.

Key points made during the panel included reminders to take a break, let down your guard, and weave in the occasional personal anecdote or post a picture not directly related to the cause. Those types of human touches generate genuine dialogue and strengthen the community’s connections. 

Give Everyone in Your Organization a Voice

Corporate integration is very important—every department should be a part of the conversation. To expand the personality of an organization, allow various staff to lend their voice, share different perspectives on the latest developments of the campaign they support, and connect to different segments of your community. 

Another option, if your company is diverse enough, you may want to consider giving key staff members their own social media “sub-accounts” that capture their own marketing share based on their expertise. For example, the Center for American Progress has a corporate Twitter account @AmProg, and most of its policy experts have their own Twitter accounts with their own audiences. This allows the Center for American Progress to put a “human face” to each cause.

You may also face the dilemma that not everyone should talk to the public directly—the accounting practices of your organization are probably not the most engaging content if you’re trying to raise awareness and action around environmental issues. Though internally, an ongoing conversation should exist. Elements of internal organizational news may carry enough weight to funnel through to external communication.

Mistakes Are Okay—Learn from Them

When asked how an organization should react if mistakes are made using social media, the panelists answered that rapid-response crisis management should be a part of an organization’s social media plan. Silence is the worst possible response. Instead, the organization should face the issue head-on and use it as an opportunity to show their human side and engage the audience in a conversation.

The panelists referenced a case study involving an errant tweet sent out by the Red Cross earlier this year. An employee with access to the @RedCross Twitter account accidentally posted an update meant for her personal account to the @RedCross feed that said “Ryan found two more four-bottle packs of Dogfish Head’s Midas Touch beer . . .when we drink, we do it right. #gettngslizzerd.” The Red Cross deleted the Tweet, but acknowledged it with a followup Tweet “We’ve deleted the rogue tweet, but rest assured the Red Cross is sober and we’ve confiscated the keys.” By embracing the mistake and displaying a sense of humor, the Red Cross saw a flurry of supportive comments in their Twitter feed and a brief increase of donations. The hashtag #gettngslizzerd became an inside joke and Dogfish Head brewery even got in on the action by encouraging its followers to donate. 

The Red Cross incident illustrates how much people love the human element behind social media. Knowing there is an actual person behind the username living, sharing, and listening, makes the organization more relevant and its message resonate more with its community.

How do you ensure that the person behind the computer is exposed in your organization? Have you noticed an increased effectiveness of social media when you let down your guard?
 

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Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for standing by. Welcome to the Kirkland's Inc. First Quarter 2013 Conference Call. <>Instructions] As a reminder, this conference is being recorded Thursday, May 23, 2013. I would now like to turn the conference over to Mr. Tripp Sullivan of Corporate Communications. Please go ahead.Thank you. Good morning, and welcome to this Kirkland's Inc. Conference Call to review the company's results for the first quarter of Fiscal 2013. On the call this morning are Robert Alderson, President and Chief Executive Officer; and Mike Madden, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.The results, as well as notice of the accessibility in this conference call on a listen only basis over the Internet, were released earlier this morning in a press release that's been covered by the financial media. Except for historical information discussed during this conference call, the statements made by company management are forward looking and made pursuant to the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward looking statements involve known and unknown risks and uncertainties, which may cause Kirkland's actual results in future periods to differ materially from forecasted results. Those risks and uncertainties are more fully described in Kirkland's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the company's annual report on Form 10 K filed on April 18, 2013.With that said, I'll turn the call over to Mike for a review of the financial results. Mike?Thank you, Tripp, and good morning, everybody. A strong finish to the first quarter, better than expected merchandise margin and the timing of certain marketing expenses led to the outperformance versus our earnings guidance range.For the first quarter, net sales were $101.2 million, a 3.5% increase versus the prior year quarter. Comparable store sales, including e commerce sales, decreased 2.3%. Comparable brick and mortar sales were down 3.1%. E commerce sales were $3.9 million for the quarter, a 19.1% increase over the prior year quarter. At the store level, the comp sale decline was driven by a 4% decline in transactions and a 1% increase in the average ticket.The decrease in transactions resulted from a 7% decrease in traffic counts, offset by a 3% improvement in the conversion rate. The increase in the average ticket was the result of an increase in items per transaction, partly offset by a lower average retail selling price.From a geographic standpoint, sales results were mixed. On the positive side, comp sales results in the Gulf Coast states were strongest, offset by weakness in the far West and some areas of the upper Midwest and South. The important state of Texas, with over 60 stores, performed at the company average.Merchandise category is showing strong comp performance for mirrors, lamps, wall decor and candles. These increases were offset primarily by declines in art, furniture and frames. We opened 1 store and closed 7 stores during the quarter, bringing us to 317 at quarter's end. 87% of the stores were in off mall venues and 13% were located in enclosed malls. And at the end of the quarter, we had 2.32 million square feet under lease. That's a 12.2% increase from the prior year. Average store size was up 5.2% at 7,324 square feet.Gross profit margin for the first quarter decreased 41 basis points to 38.9% of sales from 39.3% in the prior year. The components of reported gross profit margin were as follows: first, merchandise margin decreased 38 basis points as a percentage of sales. As expected, higher inbound freight costs negatively affected the margin during the quarter, providing a headwind of approximately 100 basis points.Aside from the inbound freight pressure, merchandise margins actually improved year over year as a result of a more effective, better controlled promotional activity and an improving sales trend. The latter part of the quarter provided the largest portion of the year over year merchandise margin lift.Secondly, store occupancy costs were basically flat as a percentage of sales, decreasing 7 basis points versus the prior year, despite the negative comp performance. This decline can be attributed to additional rent reductions and the closure of under or unproductive stores.Third, outbound freight costs were also flat as a percent of sales, reflecting lower diesel costs and lower shipping charges for e commerce.And last, central distribution costs increased very slightly as percentage of sales due to deleverage.Operating expenses for the quarter were $32.8 million or 32.4% of sales as compared to $32.3 million or 33% of sales for the prior year quarter, a reduction of 60 basis points as a percentage of sales despite a comp decline for the quarter.The operating expense ratio benefited from well managed store payroll and a decrease in marketing expenses. These benefits were offset partly by an increase in incentive pay accruals at both the store and the corporate levels.Depreciation and amortization increased 66 basis points as a percentage of sales, reflecting the increase in capital expenditures in recent fiscal years and the implementation of major technology upgrades during 2012.Operating income for the first quarter was $2.8 million or 2.8% of sales as compared to $3.2 million or 3.2% of sales in the prior year quarter. Income tax expense was $1.1 million, 37.4% of pretax income versus expense of $1.2 million or 38.4% of pretax income, which was recorded in the prior year quarter. The net income for the quarter was $1.8 million, $0.10 per diluted share as compared to a net income of $2 million or $0.10 per diluted share in the prior year.Turning to the balance sheet and the cash flow statement. Inventories at May 4, 2013 were $47.9 million as compared to $47.5 million in the prior year. These numbers reflect an increase in total inventory of 1% and a decrease of 5% on a per store basis.Based on our experience from last year's Q2, we planned inventory levels down versus the prior year to place greater emphasis on improving our merchandise margin. At the end of the quarter, we had $74.1 million in cash on hand, compared to $67.8 million at the end of fiscal 2012 and $73.2 million in the prior year period. The increase in cash came despite heavy capital investment and the completion of our share repurchase program last year.No borrowings were outstanding under our revolving line of credit. Cash flows from operations were $8.6 million for the quarter, reflecting better inventory control and an increase in tenant allowance collections, combined with positive operating performance.Capital expenditures were $2.3 million, down from $4.1 million in the prior year quarter and reflective of our planned reduction in capital expenditures for fiscal 2013.As we look ahead to the second quarter of fiscal 2013, we expect total sales to be in the range of $97 million to $98 million, reflecting a nominal decrease to a nominal increase in comparable store sales results, compared with sales of $91 million and a comparable store sales decrease of 3.6% in the prior year quarter.As we have discussed before, the shifts in the retail calendar for fiscal 2013 impact our quarterly comp guidance. Each quarter during fiscal 2013 starts one week later than the same quarter of fiscal 2012, due to the retail calendar for fiscal 2012 having 53 weeks versus the typical 52 weeks.Inside the second quarter, this shift will provide a positive benefit of approximately 100 basis points, which is contemplated in our comp guidance. As we entered the second quarter, sales trends had improved from where we began the year. However, traffic continues to lag the prior year and remains the primary deterrent in achieving positive comps.Conversion in average ticket have improved, but not yet enough to offset the traffic decline. Importantly, merchandise margin trends have also improved, enhancing our profitability during the first quarter and are expected to gain on the prior year during the second quarter, despite continued headwinds from inbound freight costs.Operating expenses are expected to increase slightly as a percentage of sales, reflecting expenses associated with our ongoing marketing test, which will impact Q2 a little more than originally forecast due to the shift from Q1 I mentioned earlier.We expect to report a loss of $0.08 to $0.11 per share for the quarter as compared to a loss of $0.11 in the prior year. We plan on opening 6 stores and closing approximately 5 stores. 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Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for standing by. Welcome to the Kirkland's Inc. First Quarter 2013 Conference Call. <>Instructions] As a reminder, this conference is being recorded Thursday, May 23, 2013. I would now like to turn the conference over to Mr. Tripp Sullivan of Corporate Communications. Please go ahead.Thank you. Good morning, and welcome to this Kirkland's Inc. Conference Call to review the company's results for the first quarter of Fiscal 2013. On the call this morning are Robert Alderson, President and Chief Executive Officer; and Mike Madden, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.The results, as well as notice of the accessibility in this conference call on a listen only basis over the Internet, were released earlier this morning in a press release that's been covered by the financial media. Except for historical information discussed during this conference call, the statements made by company management are forward looking and made pursuant to the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward looking statements involve known and unknown risks and uncertainties, which may cause Kirkland's actual results in future periods to differ materially from forecasted results. Those risks and uncertainties are more fully described in Kirkland's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the company's annual report on Form 10 K filed on April 18, 2013.With that said, I'll turn the call over to Mike for a review of the financial results. Mike?Thank you, Tripp, and good morning, everybody. A strong finish to the first quarter, better than expected merchandise margin and the timing of certain marketing expenses led to the outperformance versus our earnings guidance range.For the first quarter, net sales were $101.2 million, a 3.5% increase versus the prior year quarter. Comparable store sales, including e commerce sales, decreased 2.3%. Comparable brick and mortar sales were down 3.1%. E commerce sales were $3.9 million for the quarter, a 19.1% increase over the prior year quarter. At the store level, the comp sale decline was driven by a 4% decline in transactions and a 1% increase in the average ticket.The decrease in transactions resulted from a 7% decrease in traffic counts, offset by a 3% improvement in the conversion rate. The increase in the average ticket was the result of an increase in items per transaction, partly offset by a lower average retail selling price.From a geographic standpoint, sales results were mixed. On the positive side, comp sales results in the Gulf Coast states were strongest, offset by weakness in the far West and some areas of the upper Midwest and South. The important state of Texas, with over 60 stores, performed at the company average.Merchandise category is showing strong comp performance for mirrors, lamps, wall decor and candles. These increases were offset primarily by declines in art, furniture and frames. We opened 1 store and closed 7 stores during the quarter, bringing us to 317 at quarter's end. 87% of the stores were in off mall venues and 13% were located in enclosed malls. And at the end of the quarter, we had 2.32 million square feet under lease. That's a 12.2% increase from the prior year. Average store size was up 5.2% at 7,324 square feet.Gross profit margin for the first quarter decreased 41 basis points to 38.9% of sales from 39.3% in the prior year. The components of reported gross profit margin were as follows: first, merchandise margin decreased 38 basis points as a percentage of sales. As expected, higher inbound freight costs negatively affected the margin during the quarter, providing a headwind of approximately 100 basis points.Aside from the inbound freight pressure, merchandise margins actually improved year over year as a result of a more effective, better controlled promotional activity and an improving sales trend. The latter part of the quarter provided the largest portion of the year over year merchandise margin lift.Secondly, store occupancy costs were basically flat as a percentage of sales, decreasing 7 basis points versus the prior year, despite the negative comp performance. This decline can be attributed to additional rent reductions and the closure of under or unproductive stores.Third, outbound freight costs were also flat as a percent of sales, reflecting lower diesel costs and lower shipping charges for e commerce.And last, central distribution costs increased very slightly as percentage of sales due to deleverage.Operating expenses for the quarter were $32.8 million or 32.4% of sales as compared to $32.3 million or 33% of sales for the prior year quarter, a reduction of 60 basis points as a percentage of sales despite a comp decline for the quarter.The operating expense ratio benefited from well managed store payroll and a decrease in marketing expenses. These benefits were offset partly by an increase in incentive pay accruals at both the store and the corporate levels.Depreciation and amortization increased 66 basis points as a percentage of sales, reflecting the increase in capital expenditures in recent fiscal years and the implementation of major technology upgrades during 2012.Operating income for the first quarter was $2.8 million or 2.8% of sales as compared to $3.2 million or 3.2% of sales in the prior year quarter. Income tax expense was $1.1 million, 37.4% of pretax income versus expense of $1.2 million or 38.4% of pretax income, which was recorded in the prior year quarter. The net income for the quarter was $1.8 million, $0.10 per diluted share as compared to a net income of $2 million or $0.10 per diluted share in the prior year.Turning to the balance sheet and the cash flow statement. Inventories at May 4, 2013 were $47.9 million as compared to $47.5 million in the prior year. These numbers reflect an increase in total inventory of 1% and a decrease of 5% on a per store basis.Based on our experience from last year's Q2, we planned inventory levels down versus the prior year to place greater emphasis on improving our merchandise margin. At the end of the quarter, we had $74.1 million in cash on hand, compared to $67.8 million at the end of fiscal 2012 and $73.2 million in the prior year period. The increase in cash came despite heavy capital investment and the completion of our share repurchase program last year.No borrowings were outstanding under our revolving line of credit. Cash flows from operations were $8.6 million for the quarter, reflecting better inventory control and an increase in tenant allowance collections, combined with positive operating performance.Capital expenditures were $2.3 million, down from $4.1 million in the prior year quarter and reflective of our planned reduction in capital expenditures for fiscal 2013.As we look ahead to the second quarter of fiscal 2013, we expect total sales to be in the range of $97 million to $98 million, reflecting a nominal decrease to a nominal increase in comparable store sales results, compared with sales of $91 million and a comparable store sales decrease of 3.6% in the prior year quarter.As we have discussed before, the shifts in the retail calendar for fiscal 2013 impact our quarterly comp guidance. Each quarter during fiscal 2013 starts one week later than the same quarter of fiscal 2012, due to the retail calendar for fiscal 2012 having 53 weeks versus the typical 52 weeks.Inside the second quarter, this shift will provide a positive benefit of approximately 100 basis points, which is contemplated in our comp guidance. As we entered the second quarter, sales trends had improved from where we began the year. However, traffic continues to lag the prior year and remains the primary deterrent in achieving positive comps.Conversion in average ticket have improved, but not yet enough to offset the traffic decline. Importantly, merchandise margin trends have also improved, enhancing our profitability during the first quarter and are expected to gain on the prior year during the second quarter, despite continued headwinds from inbound freight costs.Operating expenses are expected to increase slightly as a percentage of sales, reflecting expenses associated with our ongoing marketing test, which will impact Q2 a little more than originally forecast due to the shift from Q1 I mentioned earlier.We expect to report a loss of $0.08 to $0.11 per share for the quarter as compared to a loss of $0.11 in the prior year. We plan on opening 6 stores and closing approximately 5 stores. 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Apple advantage, and it should not be underestimated, is that they know how this works and also can take advantage of scale based upon their iTunes history., Amazon's business practices have produced a spark of protectionism in France, where, in a regulatory fit of pique, the Assemble nationale approved a law aimed at defending independent bookshops. If passed by the senate, the law would prohibit retailers from offering free delivery on discounted books., Drop a video in the drop box do you have to be parked directly in front of the box?

A little while ago, I met a girlfriend in our local cafe. Our conversation turned to the affects of screen time on our kids. Are screens and going online making our children antisocial? was the question we tossed around. Do screens affect our children's ability to learn and concentrate? was another. My kids could easily become glued to screens if I let them, was her general belief. Sitting in front of computer screens was too solitary. Screens are detrimental to the development of their social skills; they affect their ability to learn too. Wouldn't you agree? she asked.No, not really, I shrugged.I don't allow them on the screens for too long, she said in a superior tone. I want them to be active. I want them to have sound social skills, and to be able to learn properly; they're allowed an hour per day and that's it.Oh, I said. I had nothing to add. What could I have said, your kids are better learners than mine? They're better communicators, have superior social skills?Tussles Over Computer Screens are a Time Waster I became a mother 18 years ago. Raising four children (one girl and three boys), has brought numerous, tiring and time wasting tussles over screens. As they have grown older, these tussles have reduced because the kids have matured and we as parents have grown up too. Recently we realized that our daughter had been firing up the computer after we'd gone to bed, to blog, to cruise the Internet, watch a movie, or go on a social networking site. She'd done this since year 8 in secondary school (she's now in year 12)! On other days, she'd set her alarm for 5am to squeeze in an early morning session before her day began.Our youngest son, a twin, learns the drums, plays Under 13 club soccer, and loves to bake cookies. He also opts for screens whenever he can. He does a lot of his homework related research on the Internet science, history, geography. His last science project (inspired by a science book) was submitted as a video recording of an experiment which he planned, executed, narrated, and filmed. He edited excerpts, created the credits, added in sound effects. I have yet to find him as engrossed in any paper based task equivalent; I was heartened to see that he found genuine enjoyment in doing his science homework and could focus for extended periods.Child Development, Social Skills, Ability to Learn, and Computer ScreensOur older son in year 9 learned how to use a fry pan on an induction stove without burning it by searching how to sites online. Whenever he needs directions to get to an unknown destination in the city for a school Outprac, he does an Internet search. Last year he began to teach himself how to play the piano. Now, when he hears a piece of music he likes, he plays from sheet music he has downloaded and printed after listening to various renditions on YouTube. When he is able to play it fluently, he checks back with a recording to hear how experienced musicians interpret the music.Do our kids read books? Yes they do! We have enforced reading time for years. The older two have been avid readers since they were little, and they're on the screens as much as they can, just like the younger two.Children Go Online to Read, Learn, and Be SocialThe younger two on the other hand rarely choose to pick up a book despite their being competent readers. We have insisted that they read every night for half an hour for years. Sometimes they read fiction, but they prefer the comics or factual books which is fine by me, as long as they read.We might as well accept that kids these days are wired to learn online. They come to the computer with a real purpose. Their eager minds learn not only by reading text but by using their other senses and simultaneously absorbing information visually from images and aurally through sound files. It gives them the opportunity of interacting there and then with a specific aspect of the world they are keen to find out more about. What better way than to nurture instantly a child's genuine interest in something! Especially when done with class mates at school or siblings at home; suddenly it is no longer a solitary act but a lively, social, and engaging opportunity to learn something new.Children Learn and Improve General Knowledge Using Internet SearchesMy children have many questions about a lot of topics, and those that they cannot find answers to via the normal route ask mum or dad or an older sibling they type their query into a search engine. One son can tell me why placing pressure on a wound eases the pain, and my daughter who is thinking of becoming a vegan, has researched the philosophical, health, and environmental implications of veganism. If my children need a question answered or their knowledge broadened, they do an instant search on the Internet.It's such an anti social thing, snorted the mother when I mentioned how much my children learn and play on the computer. Kids these days prefer to chat on a computer than in person, their social skills are atrocious, can't string together a sentence, they have no emotional intelligence. The computer is turning them into geeks who can't hold a conversation.Her views resonate with similar assertions in the article Facebook: Taking the 'social' out of networking, that internet networking generates antisocial patterns of behaviour, and isolates and detaches individuals from society. And that children may have attention difficulties, delays in language, and smaller vocabularies as a result of too much time in front of screens, as stated by Judith Graham (2011).Perhaps there's a link that shows that increased technology use affects the ability to learn and the development of good social skills. My younger son says that when he's reading tucked away in his bedroom, he feels disconnected. But on the computer, he's practices arithmetic online with children on the other side of the world, and he finds the images on the screen and the interactivity aspect entertaining unlike the single activity of reading a book. Books are solitary, he says.Building Social Skills and Civic AwarenessLet me say again that I have always insisted that my children read every day for at least half an hour. Had I had access to technology while growing up, I too would have developed an ability to learn on the computer and had a social life online. Now that the computer is such a large part of our lives at work, at home, at school, on holidays for us adults it too is an engaging tool that enables fast connection to people and information around the world.I disagree with my friend's argument that screens have hindered the development of my children's social skills and their ability to learn. People need the skills to discover, sift through, and analyze new information in order to thrive in the digital age. Being actively engaged in their learning no matter which media is used, surely nurtures their natural curiosity to find out more. Mark Henderson states that teenagers who surf the internet for hours are not being antisocial and withdrawn; in fact, they are building their social skills and civic awareness (2006).Create, Innovate, Forge New Knowledge, Sort InformationEstablishing armies and fighting battles, designing and constructing buildings and cities with roads and train tracks is not a new activity in childhood. Doing these things online especially with others in a team helps develop skills that children can carry throughout their school life and eventually into the adult world. Recently I watched my son build a city. His aim was to attract people to move to the city he was creating. He played the role of a developer, and as he developed city areas to which people came, he sold them materials such as wood and stone so that they could continue to construct buildings; he also sold them cloth for their clothes, and wheat and other foods so that they could subsist. He was dabbling in fantasy financial markets and learning about infrastructure needed in cities. The ability to sort through information, apply new knowledge, create and innovate, concentrate and learn, are life skills that we parents must surely encourage in our childrenFor my children, screen time and going online hasn't made them antisocial, nor have I seen evidence that computers affect my children's ability to learn and concentrate. On the contrary, when it comes to screen time they are far from being isolated doing a solitary activity.The Affects of Screen Time on Child DevelopmentTussles over computer screens with children are a waste of time. Computers in this digital age are here to stay. They can play an important role in child development and can affect the ability to learn. Children these days go online to read, to learn, and to be social. Computers Make for Chatty Children: Net surfing is not responsible for anti social young people quite the opposite. in The Sunday Times. UK. Facebook: Taking the 'Social' Out of Networking. 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He loved the outdoors, camping, ATVing, and enjoyed attending the Blues Festivals. On Oct. 7, 1989, Sonny said he met the love of his life, Faline. They enjoyed 25 wonderful years together. He was predeceased by his dad; his brother, Ronnie; and infant daughter Rosa. He is survived by his loving wife, Faline Badger; his mother, Zelma Theriault; his children, Robert Badger, Martin Badger and wife, Sheryl, Donna King, Herbie Badger, and Jamey Badger; several grandchildren; twin sisters, Ena and Rena; and brother, Ricky. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Sonny name to the Lafayette Cancer Center, 33 Whiting Hill Road, Brewer, ME 04412. There will be a graveside service in the spring. Barclay, 86, wife of the late Clarence L. Barclay, passed away Friday evening, Dec. 13, 2013, at a Caribou health care facility following a brief illness. Tuesday, Dec. 17, at Mockler Funeral Home, 24 Reservoir St., Caribou. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at Holy Rosary Catholic Church, Caribou. Spring interment will take place at New Holy Rosary Catholic Cemetery, Caribou. A time of continued fellowship with refreshments will be held after the Mass at Holy Rosary Catholic Church Fellowship Hall. Those who wish may contribute in Mrs. Barclay memory to the Caribou Ecumenical Food Pantry, 49 Herschel St., Caribou, ME 04736. Grant, 89, died Dec. 13, 2013, at a Bangor hospital. Born Nov. 16, 1924, in Searsport, she was the daughter of Maynard and Mary (Robbins) Carr. Jeanette married Milford W. Grant on Aug. 10, 1946, in Searsport. She loved to travel with her sisters and enjoyed cooking, baking and spending time with her family. She was a member of the United Methodist Woman Organization here in Searsport and also in Connecticut where she and her husband lived while raising their family. She is survived by her husband of 67 years, Milford W. Grant of Searsport; one daughter, Janet Mongillo of Searsport and Southington, Conn.; two granddaughters, Lori Mongillo of Connecticut and Marci Mongillo Clevenger of Tennessee; two great grandchildren, ErikaRose Sokolowski of Connecticut, and Brodie Clevenger of Tennessee; three sisters, Eunice Cushman of Texas and Vermont, Adelaide Rossi of Massachusetts, and Tina Gould of Searsport; a sister in law, Barbara Carr of Searsport; a special cousin, Darlene Carr of Searsport; a special nephew, Rodney Littlefield and his wife, Betty, of Belfast; several additional nieces and nephews; and her beloved dog and companion, Lexi. Jeanette was predeceased by her parents; one brother, James Carr; a son in law, John A. Mongillo; four brothers in law, Ernest Cushman, Lloyd Gould, Walter Cory, and Vernon Grant; and one sister in law, Lila Littlefield. Box 122, Searsport, ME 04976. Monday, Dec. 16, at Young Funeral Home, 31 West Main St., Searsport. Tuesday, Dec. 17, at Searsport United Methodist Church, Searsport. Burial will take place at Merithew Cemetery, Searsport, at a later date in the spring. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Young Funeral Home. 13, 2013, surrounded by her family at Millinocket Regional Hospital. Pauline was born Dec. 19, 1927, in Millinocket, the daughter of Bessie (Thompkins) and Burns W. Elkins, Sr. Pauline graduated Stearns High School and attended Millinocket Baptist Church. She lived and worked from Maine to California. She loved her garden flowers, crocheting, and her pets Miss Kitty and Cleo. She would sit afternoons in her gazebo watching wild birds at the feeders. Pauline is survived by her brothers, Burns Jr., and Douglas W. Elkins and his fianc Ann Warren; Doug son, Anthony, whom she loved like her own; and several cousins, nieces, and nephews. She will be especially missed by her friends, Anita Moscone; and nieces, Wanda Gardner and Kim Chase. She was predeceased by her brothers, Robert, Lawrence, and Dean; and her best friend, Butch. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at Lamson Funeral Home, 11 Tamarack St., Millinocket, with Pastor Tim Bossie officiating. 14, 2013, at the age of 86, in his Fort Kent home with the company of his loving family. Roger was devoted to his family and active in many community organizations. He was known as one whom others could go to for help with a variety of needs. Roger served his country as an MP staff sergeant in the 10th Mountain Division of the United States Army stationed in Colorado. Following his military service Roger was Deputy Aroostook County Sheriff for 32 years and functioned as a civic leader in a variety of functions in Saint Francis including ten years as First Selectman, four years on the Town School Board, seven years as Chairman of the town Democratic Committee, and four years as Chairman of the Health Center. until his retirement in 2000. He also served 13 years on the SAD 27 School Board, and most recently as a member of the Aroostook Area Agency on Aging Board of Directors. He also served as Commander of Post 180 of the American Legion where he was a member for 65 years. Roger Harvey also served the Catholic Church in numerous capacities including as Chairman of the Building Committee for Saint Charles Church in Saint Francis; six years as Grand Knight of the Knights of Columbus Council 1934 and one year as Faithful Navigator. Roger was born Aug. 30, 1927, in St. Francis, to Francis Harvey and Marianne Jandreau Harvey. He is survived by his wife, Violet Thibodeau Harvey; three children, Joan Banville of Madawaska, Brenda Harvey and husband, David Lawlor, of Gardner, and Gary Harvey and special daughter in law, Louise, of Fort Kent; five grandchildren and seven great grandchildren whom he cherished; a sister, Edwina Harvey; and many special nieces and nephews. The family wishes to thank Lola Plourde and Gwen Kendall of Hospice of Aroostook for the respectful care and support they provided Roger and his family during his last days. until time of service Tuesday, at Daigle Funeral Home, Fort Kent. Tuesday, at St. Louis Catholic Church, Fort Kent. Those who wish to donate in Roger memory may do so to St. John Vianney Renovation Fund, 26 E. Main St., Fort Kent, ME 04743; or to Hospice of Aroostook, 14 Access Highway, Caribou, ME 04736. 13, 2013, at the USVA Togus Hospice Unit, Augusta. David was born Oct. 1, 1935, in Old Town, to Carl D. and Irene G.(McIninch) Ketchen. He graduated from Old Town High School, class of 1953. David was predeceased by his parents; his brother, Alfred Ketchen; and sister in law, Joan of Trenton. David is survived by Denise, his loving wife of 55 years; three sons, Scott and wife, Agnes, Michael and wife, Miranda, and Brian and wife, Kellie, all of Winthrop; four grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. David is also survived by his brother, Donald Ketchen and wife, Lise, of Old Town, with whom he shared many joyous times at their brother, Alfred seaside home in Trenton. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at Knowlton Hewins Roberts Funeral Home, Bowdoin Street, Winthrop. Thursday, Dec. 19, at St. Francis Xavier Church, Route 133, Winthrop. Friday, Dec. 20, at Veterans Memorial Cemetary, Augusta. 10, 2013. She was married over 67 years to her Waltz partner, Carlton Edward King. Born Sept. 29, 1927, in Bangor, she was the daughter of Almon William Sr. and Mary Elizabeth (Grover) Haskell. Rosemary legacy is the unconditional love she gave to her family and friends, and her commitment to excellence in all she endeavored. The love and care given to her special needs daughter is eternal. She will be missed by many who loved and respected the remarkable woman she was. Surviving in addition to her husband, Carlton of Bangor are three children, David King and his wife, Miriam, of Brewer, Pamela Ware and her husband, Richard, of Brewer and Roseanne Beth King of Bangor; three grandchildren, Andrew King and his wife, Rita, of New York City, Adam King and his wife, Nahisha, of Brewer and Michael King and his fianc Asheley Curliss, of Portland; four stepgrandchildren, Jennifer MacDonald of Hampden, Charles Ware and his wife, Holly, Bruce Ware and his wife, Jill, and Clifford Ware and his wife, Veronica, all of California; three great grandchildren, Carmen Marie King, Lowell David King, and David Joseph King; one sister, Phyllis Grant and her husband, Harold, of Hampden; three sisters in law, Marguerite Haskell of Carmel, Natalie Haskell of Sangerville, and Barbara Haskell of Orrington; and her beloved nieces and nephews. Along with her parents, she was predeceased by three brothers, Percy, William, and Alfred Haskell. Her in laws on Carlton side of the family include, Alice (King) Provost of Brewer, Roland Chesley of Litchfield, and Elizabeth (King) and Robert Masse of New Hampshire. She was predeceased by in laws, Dorothy (King) Moody of Bucksport, Catherine (King) Chesley of Litchfield, and Arthur Provost of Brewer. Services will be held at a later date. Leighton Gee, 86, died peacefully Dec. 13, 2013, at Downeast Community Hospital after a courageous battle with cancer. She was born May 18, 1927, in Lubec, the daughter of John and Winnie (Ramsdell) Pressley. Glennys married Murray Leighton and together they had two children, Rebecca (Mallock) Leighton and son, Jeffrey Leighton. She was a member of the Ladies Auxilliary Legion Post No. 65 of Lubec. Glennys was predeceased by her husband, Murray; daughter, Rebecca; son in law, Butch; infant son, Jeffrey; and brothers, John Pressley and Clayton Pressley. Surviving are her granddaughters, Lisa Mallock and her companion, Gregg Terry of Lubec, Melissa (Mallock) Farren and husband, Phil Farren, of Lubec; grandchildren, Jordan Jones, Braden Pottle, Nancy and Heather Farren, baby Alayna, and Lauren Terry; sisters, Phyllis Lingley, and Lois Denbow; brother, David Pressley and wife, Juanita, all of Lubec; as well as several nieces and nephews. Her joy in life was her grandchildren and she loved attending all of their sporting events or any other activities they were involved with . She was always so supportive and proud of them. Gee Gee was a loving and nurturing person to everyone who knew her. She will be remembered by her many friends and family for her generous heart, keen wit and happy spirit. Dec. 19, at Temple Christian Church, Lubec. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Lubec Elementary School Athletic Fund, 44 South St., Lubec, ME 04652. Arrangements are in care of McClure Family Funeral Services, Machias and Lubec. McNeil, 87, wife of the late William V. McNeil, died Dec. 15, 2013, at a Bangor hospital surrounded by her children after a brief illness. She was born Oct. 12, 1926, in Bangor, the daughter of Frank J. and Mary (Dunn) Guite. Teresa was a lifelong communicant of St. John Catholic Church. She attended St. John School and was a graduate of John Bapst High School. She was employed at the Garland St. Pharmacy, Viner Shoe Company and the American Heart Association. She was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, great grandmother and friend and was very involved in the lives of her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. She is survived by two children, Joseph L. McNeil and his wife, Sharon, of Bangor and Mary Lou Armes and her husband, William, of Brewer; three grandchildren, Travis Armes of Shirley, Mass., Joseph E. and Brooke O. She was predeceased by her siblings, Sr. Mary Fulgentia Guite, Marguerite Kearney, Laura Murray, Edmund and Francis Guite and William Collins. Tuesday, Dec. 17, at Kiley Foley Funeral Service, 299 Union St., Bangor. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at St. Paul the Apostle Parish, St. John Catholic Church, York St., Bangor, with the Rev. Frank J. Murray, Teresa nephew, presiding. Box 1749, Bangor, ME 04402 1749. Montcalm died Dec. 13, 2013, at an MDI health care facility. She was born in Moravia, Iowa, the daughter of William C. and Fern S. (Armstrong) Main. Margaret and her late husband, Col. Roger Montcalm were married in 1956. They lived in Germany for many years along with their daughter, Elizabeth. They enjoyed traveling all over Europe. When they moved to Maryland, Margaret became the Clerk at the Prince George County Courthouse. She worked there for over 25 years. Upon her retirement she and Roger moved to Southwest Harbor. Margaret was active in the Eastern Star, Irene Chapter No. 97 and the Daughters of the American Revolution. Margaret is survived by her daughter, Elizabeth Montcalm Smith and husband, Charles C.; a granddaughter, Katherine M. Smith, all of Kensington, Md.; two sisters, Christine Proudfort and husband, Max, of Twenty Nine Palms, Calif., and Madeleine Obermeyer and husband, Frank, of San Antonio; and special friends, Wally and Denise Heinbach, of Pennsylvania. She was predeceased in 1988 by her husband of 32 years, Col. Roger Montcalm. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at Jordan Fernald, 1139 Main St., Mount Desert. Interment will be at Arlington National Cemetery. Those who desire may make contributions in Margaret memory to the Daughter of the American Revolution, Mount Desert Isle Chapter, Chapter Regent, 49 Ledgelawn Ave., Bar Harbor, ME 04609. 13, 2013. He was born Dec. 11, 1931, in Sherman Mills, the son of Ranie and Rita Morrow. Army during the Korean War conflict. He married Maxine Raymond of Millinocket in 1955. Shortly after, they moved to Boston where Ken pursued his love of music, graduating from the prestigious Berkeley School of Music. Excelling in flute, clarinet and sax, he had the honor of meeting and jamming with Duke Ellington. Ken and Maxine returned to Millinocket where he began his 31 year career with the postal service, retiring in 1987. While working full time, he completely remodeled their home, an accomplishment he was most proud of. From spring to late fall Ken and Maxine could be seen spending many hours enjoying their porch. Self taught in the art of veneering, he created numerous intricate marquetry items. In addition to music, he enjoyed gardening, reading, and fishing, particularly his many trips to Slaughter Pond. Throughout his life, in whatever peaked his interest, he would fully immerse himself and attain incredible proficiency. Ken is survived by his wife, Maxine; daughter, Cynthia Hodge and husband, Stephen; daughter, Suzanne Sirois and husband, Roland; grandchildren, Shannon Sirois, Christopher and David Hodge; brother, Eldon Morrow; and many special relatives. He also leaves behind his beloved cat, Wesley. A graveside service with military honors will be held in the spring. Memorial contributions may be made to The Activity Fund at Katahdin Healthcare, 22 Walnut St., Millinocket, ME 04462. 13, 2013, at a Bangor health care facility surrounded by her loving family. Betty was born March 13, 1922, in Brewer, the daughter of Raymond W. and Charlotte E. (Hawes) Greene. Betty was a 41 year member and past Matron of the Star in the East Chapter No. 17 and a Grand Representative from Maine to Missouri. She was a faithful and active member of the Hampden Highlands United Methodist Church. Betty will be remembered as a loving mother, sister, aunt, and friend. Betty is survived by her son, John Tenney Jr. and wife, Kendra, of Eddington; her sister, Margaret Estelle Tenney of Hampden; and several brothers in law, sisters in law, nieces, nephews, and friends. Betty was predeceased by her husband, John; an infant son; a brother, Raymond Greene; and brother in law, Herbert Tenney. In keeping with Betty wishes, interment will be private at Mount Hope Cemetery, Bangor. Box 23, Hampden, ME 04444. Arrangements entrusted to Hampden Gilpatrick Funeral Home, 45 Western Ave., Hampden. 11, 2013, was many things throughout his life. He was a husband, a father, a brother, and a grandfather. He was a man of God, never overlooking his faith. He was a friend to many, and an inspiration to all. Ronny had a lot of love in his heart, and he never hesitated to share that love with all people in his life. Through all of his life experiences, through everything he was and all the relationships he held so dear, there was one phrase that Ronald Walden lived by, a phrase that sums up his life in the colorful manner he so desired: ILTICOTL I Like To Color Outside The Lines. Ronald Walden, that ol fuddy duddy, was a man of family, love, and faith. That is how he will be remembered: By his family and friends, with love, in faith. A memorial service will be held in the spring of 2014 in Greenville. The date has yet to be determined. Contributions may be made in his name to Good Will Hinckley School, which held a special place in Ronald heart or the Greenville Junction United Methodist Church Steeple Fund. Arrangements by Crosby Neal, Guilford. 11, 2013, as a result of an accident. Jesse was born March 20, 1983, in Bangor, daughter of Donald and Victoria (Sockabasin) Boston Jr. She graduated from St. Stephen High School, class of 2001, and attended the University of Maine at Orono. Census and for jewelry stores in Lincoln and Waterville until attending Northeast Technical Institute in Bangor where she earned her CDL to drive truck. Bouchard. Jesse loved the outdoors and enjoyed hunting, fishing, camping, cooking, photography, and was an amazing artist. Her most cherished times were spent with her son, Weston. Jesse is survived by her husband, Jason Walton of Indian Township; her beloved son, Weston Morgan Bailey of Grand Lake Stream; mother and father, Vickey and Donald Boston Jr.; paternal grandmother, Ruth Boston of South Berwick; three sisters, Shannon Ball of New Hampshire, Christine Cooper of South Paris, and Jennifer Boston of New Hampshire; three brothers, Roy Dana III of Indian Township, Donald Boston III and his wife, Veronica, of Fort Myers, Fla., and Philip Boston of Indian Township; aunts, Cindy, Sylvia, Nora, Janice, Debbie, Gail, Lori, Karen, and June; uncles, Mark, Gene, and her special uncle and hunting buddy, Richard; many nieces and nephews; numerous friends; and faithful four legged companions, Baxter, Brooke, and Fat Cat. Monday, Dec. 16, by Father Rob Lupo, at St. Anne Mission, Peter Dana Point. Burial will follow at the Tribal Cemetery. 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A little while ago, I met a girlfriend in our local cafe. Our conversation turned to the affects of screen time on our kids. Are screens and going online making our children antisocial? was the question we tossed around. Do screens affect our children's ability to learn and concentrate? was another. My kids could easily become glued to screens if I let them, was her general belief. Sitting in front of computer screens was too solitary. Screens are detrimental to the development of their social skills; they affect their ability to learn too. Wouldn't you agree? she asked.No, not really, I shrugged.I don't allow them on the screens for too long, she said in a superior tone. I want them to be active. I want them to have sound social skills, and to be able to learn properly; they're allowed an hour per day and that's it.Oh, I said. I had nothing to add. What could I have said, your kids are better learners than mine? They're better communicators, have superior social skills?Tussles Over Computer Screens are a Time Waster I became a mother 18 years ago. Raising four children (one girl and three boys), has brought numerous, tiring and time wasting tussles over screens. As they have grown older, these tussles have reduced because the kids have matured and we as parents have grown up too. Recently we realized that our daughter had been firing up the computer after we'd gone to bed, to blog, to cruise the Internet, watch a movie, or go on a social networking site. She'd done this since year 8 in secondary school (she's now in year 12)! On other days, she'd set her alarm for 5am to squeeze in an early morning session before her day began.Our youngest son, a twin, learns the drums, plays Under 13 club soccer, and loves to bake cookies. He also opts for screens whenever he can. He does a lot of his homework related research on the Internet science, history, geography. His last science project (inspired by a science book) was submitted as a video recording of an experiment which he planned, executed, narrated, and filmed. He edited excerpts, created the credits, added in sound effects. I have yet to find him as engrossed in any paper based task equivalent; I was heartened to see that he found genuine enjoyment in doing his science homework and could focus for extended periods.Child Development, Social Skills, Ability to Learn, and Computer ScreensOur older son in year 9 learned how to use a fry pan on an induction stove without burning it by searching how to sites online. Whenever he needs directions to get to an unknown destination in the city for a school Outprac, he does an Internet search. Last year he began to teach himself how to play the piano. Now, when he hears a piece of music he likes, he plays from sheet music he has downloaded and printed after listening to various renditions on YouTube. When he is able to play it fluently, he checks back with a recording to hear how experienced musicians interpret the music.Do our kids read books? Yes they do! We have enforced reading time for years. The older two have been avid readers since they were little, and they're on the screens as much as they can, just like the younger two.Children Go Online to Read, Learn, and Be SocialThe younger two on the other hand rarely choose to pick up a book despite their being competent readers. We have insisted that they read every night for half an hour for years. Sometimes they read fiction, but they prefer the comics or factual books which is fine by me, as long as they read.We might as well accept that kids these days are wired to learn online. They come to the computer with a real purpose. Their eager minds learn not only by reading text but by using their other senses and simultaneously absorbing information visually from images and aurally through sound files. It gives them the opportunity of interacting there and then with a specific aspect of the world they are keen to find out more about. What better way than to nurture instantly a child's genuine interest in something! Especially when done with class mates at school or siblings at home; suddenly it is no longer a solitary act but a lively, social, and engaging opportunity to learn something new.Children Learn and Improve General Knowledge Using Internet SearchesMy children have many questions about a lot of topics, and those that they cannot find answers to via the normal route ask mum or dad or an older sibling they type their query into a search engine. One son can tell me why placing pressure on a wound eases the pain, and my daughter who is thinking of becoming a vegan, has researched the philosophical, health, and environmental implications of veganism. If my children need a question answered or their knowledge broadened, they do an instant search on the Internet.It's such an anti social thing, snorted the mother when I mentioned how much my children learn and play on the computer. Kids these days prefer to chat on a computer than in person, their social skills are atrocious, can't string together a sentence, they have no emotional intelligence. The computer is turning them into geeks who can't hold a conversation.Her views resonate with similar assertions in the article Facebook: Taking the 'social' out of networking, that internet networking generates antisocial patterns of behaviour, and isolates and detaches individuals from society. And that children may have attention difficulties, delays in language, and smaller vocabularies as a result of too much time in front of screens, as stated by Judith Graham (2011).Perhaps there's a link that shows that increased technology use affects the ability to learn and the development of good social skills. My younger son says that when he's reading tucked away in his bedroom, he feels disconnected. But on the computer, he's practices arithmetic online with children on the other side of the world, and he finds the images on the screen and the interactivity aspect entertaining unlike the single activity of reading a book. Books are solitary, he says.Building Social Skills and Civic AwarenessLet me say again that I have always insisted that my children read every day for at least half an hour. Had I had access to technology while growing up, I too would have developed an ability to learn on the computer and had a social life online. Now that the computer is such a large part of our lives at work, at home, at school, on holidays for us adults it too is an engaging tool that enables fast connection to people and information around the world.I disagree with my friend's argument that screens have hindered the development of my children's social skills and their ability to learn. People need the skills to discover, sift through, and analyze new information in order to thrive in the digital age. Being actively engaged in their learning no matter which media is used, surely nurtures their natural curiosity to find out more. Mark Henderson states that teenagers who surf the internet for hours are not being antisocial and withdrawn; in fact, they are building their social skills and civic awareness (2006).Create, Innovate, Forge New Knowledge, Sort InformationEstablishing armies and fighting battles, designing and constructing buildings and cities with roads and train tracks is not a new activity in childhood. Doing these things online especially with others in a team helps develop skills that children can carry throughout their school life and eventually into the adult world. Recently I watched my son build a city. His aim was to attract people to move to the city he was creating. He played the role of a developer, and as he developed city areas to which people came, he sold them materials such as wood and stone so that they could continue to construct buildings; he also sold them cloth for their clothes, and wheat and other foods so that they could subsist. He was dabbling in fantasy financial markets and learning about infrastructure needed in cities. The ability to sort through information, apply new knowledge, create and innovate, concentrate and learn, are life skills that we parents must surely encourage in our childrenFor my children, screen time and going online hasn't made them antisocial, nor have I seen evidence that computers affect my children's ability to learn and concentrate. On the contrary, when it comes to screen time they are far from being isolated doing a solitary activity.The Affects of Screen Time on Child DevelopmentTussles over computer screens with children are a waste of time. Computers in this digital age are here to stay. They can play an important role in child development and can affect the ability to learn. Children these days go online to read, to learn, and to be social. Computers Make for Chatty Children: Net surfing is not responsible for anti social young people quite the opposite. in The Sunday Times. UK. Facebook: Taking the 'Social' Out of Networking. 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He loved the outdoors, camping, ATVing, and enjoyed attending the Blues Festivals. On Oct. 7, 1989, Sonny said he met the love of his life, Faline. They enjoyed 25 wonderful years together. He was predeceased by his dad; his brother, Ronnie; and infant daughter Rosa. He is survived by his loving wife, Faline Badger; his mother, Zelma Theriault; his children, Robert Badger, Martin Badger and wife, Sheryl, Donna King, Herbie Badger, and Jamey Badger; several grandchildren; twin sisters, Ena and Rena; and brother, Ricky. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Sonny name to the Lafayette Cancer Center, 33 Whiting Hill Road, Brewer, ME 04412. There will be a graveside service in the spring. Barclay, 86, wife of the late Clarence L. Barclay, passed away Friday evening, Dec. 13, 2013, at a Caribou health care facility following a brief illness. Tuesday, Dec. 17, at Mockler Funeral Home, 24 Reservoir St., Caribou. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at Holy Rosary Catholic Church, Caribou. Spring interment will take place at New Holy Rosary Catholic Cemetery, Caribou. A time of continued fellowship with refreshments will be held after the Mass at Holy Rosary Catholic Church Fellowship Hall. Those who wish may contribute in Mrs. Barclay memory to the Caribou Ecumenical Food Pantry, 49 Herschel St., Caribou, ME 04736. Grant, 89, died Dec. 13, 2013, at a Bangor hospital. Born Nov. 16, 1924, in Searsport, she was the daughter of Maynard and Mary (Robbins) Carr. Jeanette married Milford W. Grant on Aug. 10, 1946, in Searsport. She loved to travel with her sisters and enjoyed cooking, baking and spending time with her family. She was a member of the United Methodist Woman Organization here in Searsport and also in Connecticut where she and her husband lived while raising their family. She is survived by her husband of 67 years, Milford W. Grant of Searsport; one daughter, Janet Mongillo of Searsport and Southington, Conn.; two granddaughters, Lori Mongillo of Connecticut and Marci Mongillo Clevenger of Tennessee; two great grandchildren, ErikaRose Sokolowski of Connecticut, and Brodie Clevenger of Tennessee; three sisters, Eunice Cushman of Texas and Vermont, Adelaide Rossi of Massachusetts, and Tina Gould of Searsport; a sister in law, Barbara Carr of Searsport; a special cousin, Darlene Carr of Searsport; a special nephew, Rodney Littlefield and his wife, Betty, of Belfast; several additional nieces and nephews; and her beloved dog and companion, Lexi. Jeanette was predeceased by her parents; one brother, James Carr; a son in law, John A. Mongillo; four brothers in law, Ernest Cushman, Lloyd Gould, Walter Cory, and Vernon Grant; and one sister in law, Lila Littlefield. Box 122, Searsport, ME 04976. Monday, Dec. 16, at Young Funeral Home, 31 West Main St., Searsport. Tuesday, Dec. 17, at Searsport United Methodist Church, Searsport. Burial will take place at Merithew Cemetery, Searsport, at a later date in the spring. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Young Funeral Home. 13, 2013, surrounded by her family at Millinocket Regional Hospital. Pauline was born Dec. 19, 1927, in Millinocket, the daughter of Bessie (Thompkins) and Burns W. Elkins, Sr. Pauline graduated Stearns High School and attended Millinocket Baptist Church. She lived and worked from Maine to California. She loved her garden flowers, crocheting, and her pets Miss Kitty and Cleo. She would sit afternoons in her gazebo watching wild birds at the feeders. Pauline is survived by her brothers, Burns Jr., and Douglas W. Elkins and his fianc Ann Warren; Doug son, Anthony, whom she loved like her own; and several cousins, nieces, and nephews. She will be especially missed by her friends, Anita Moscone; and nieces, Wanda Gardner and Kim Chase. She was predeceased by her brothers, Robert, Lawrence, and Dean; and her best friend, Butch. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at Lamson Funeral Home, 11 Tamarack St., Millinocket, with Pastor Tim Bossie officiating. 14, 2013, at the age of 86, in his Fort Kent home with the company of his loving family. Roger was devoted to his family and active in many community organizations. He was known as one whom others could go to for help with a variety of needs. Roger served his country as an MP staff sergeant in the 10th Mountain Division of the United States Army stationed in Colorado. Following his military service Roger was Deputy Aroostook County Sheriff for 32 years and functioned as a civic leader in a variety of functions in Saint Francis including ten years as First Selectman, four years on the Town School Board, seven years as Chairman of the town Democratic Committee, and four years as Chairman of the Health Center. until his retirement in 2000. He also served 13 years on the SAD 27 School Board, and most recently as a member of the Aroostook Area Agency on Aging Board of Directors. He also served as Commander of Post 180 of the American Legion where he was a member for 65 years. Roger Harvey also served the Catholic Church in numerous capacities including as Chairman of the Building Committee for Saint Charles Church in Saint Francis; six years as Grand Knight of the Knights of Columbus Council 1934 and one year as Faithful Navigator. Roger was born Aug. 30, 1927, in St. Francis, to Francis Harvey and Marianne Jandreau Harvey. He is survived by his wife, Violet Thibodeau Harvey; three children, Joan Banville of Madawaska, Brenda Harvey and husband, David Lawlor, of Gardner, and Gary Harvey and special daughter in law, Louise, of Fort Kent; five grandchildren and seven great grandchildren whom he cherished; a sister, Edwina Harvey; and many special nieces and nephews. The family wishes to thank Lola Plourde and Gwen Kendall of Hospice of Aroostook for the respectful care and support they provided Roger and his family during his last days. until time of service Tuesday, at Daigle Funeral Home, Fort Kent. Tuesday, at St. Louis Catholic Church, Fort Kent. Those who wish to donate in Roger memory may do so to St. John Vianney Renovation Fund, 26 E. Main St., Fort Kent, ME 04743; or to Hospice of Aroostook, 14 Access Highway, Caribou, ME 04736. 13, 2013, at the USVA Togus Hospice Unit, Augusta. David was born Oct. 1, 1935, in Old Town, to Carl D. and Irene G.(McIninch) Ketchen. He graduated from Old Town High School, class of 1953. David was predeceased by his parents; his brother, Alfred Ketchen; and sister in law, Joan of Trenton. David is survived by Denise, his loving wife of 55 years; three sons, Scott and wife, Agnes, Michael and wife, Miranda, and Brian and wife, Kellie, all of Winthrop; four grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. David is also survived by his brother, Donald Ketchen and wife, Lise, of Old Town, with whom he shared many joyous times at their brother, Alfred seaside home in Trenton. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at Knowlton Hewins Roberts Funeral Home, Bowdoin Street, Winthrop. Thursday, Dec. 19, at St. Francis Xavier Church, Route 133, Winthrop. Friday, Dec. 20, at Veterans Memorial Cemetary, Augusta. 10, 2013. She was married over 67 years to her Waltz partner, Carlton Edward King. Born Sept. 29, 1927, in Bangor, she was the daughter of Almon William Sr. and Mary Elizabeth (Grover) Haskell. Rosemary legacy is the unconditional love she gave to her family and friends, and her commitment to excellence in all she endeavored. The love and care given to her special needs daughter is eternal. She will be missed by many who loved and respected the remarkable woman she was. Surviving in addition to her husband, Carlton of Bangor are three children, David King and his wife, Miriam, of Brewer, Pamela Ware and her husband, Richard, of Brewer and Roseanne Beth King of Bangor; three grandchildren, Andrew King and his wife, Rita, of New York City, Adam King and his wife, Nahisha, of Brewer and Michael King and his fianc Asheley Curliss, of Portland; four stepgrandchildren, Jennifer MacDonald of Hampden, Charles Ware and his wife, Holly, Bruce Ware and his wife, Jill, and Clifford Ware and his wife, Veronica, all of California; three great grandchildren, Carmen Marie King, Lowell David King, and David Joseph King; one sister, Phyllis Grant and her husband, Harold, of Hampden; three sisters in law, Marguerite Haskell of Carmel, Natalie Haskell of Sangerville, and Barbara Haskell of Orrington; and her beloved nieces and nephews. Along with her parents, she was predeceased by three brothers, Percy, William, and Alfred Haskell. Her in laws on Carlton side of the family include, Alice (King) Provost of Brewer, Roland Chesley of Litchfield, and Elizabeth (King) and Robert Masse of New Hampshire. She was predeceased by in laws, Dorothy (King) Moody of Bucksport, Catherine (King) Chesley of Litchfield, and Arthur Provost of Brewer. Services will be held at a later date. Leighton Gee, 86, died peacefully Dec. 13, 2013, at Downeast Community Hospital after a courageous battle with cancer. She was born May 18, 1927, in Lubec, the daughter of John and Winnie (Ramsdell) Pressley. Glennys married Murray Leighton and together they had two children, Rebecca (Mallock) Leighton and son, Jeffrey Leighton. She was a member of the Ladies Auxilliary Legion Post No. 65 of Lubec. Glennys was predeceased by her husband, Murray; daughter, Rebecca; son in law, Butch; infant son, Jeffrey; and brothers, John Pressley and Clayton Pressley. Surviving are her granddaughters, Lisa Mallock and her companion, Gregg Terry of Lubec, Melissa (Mallock) Farren and husband, Phil Farren, of Lubec; grandchildren, Jordan Jones, Braden Pottle, Nancy and Heather Farren, baby Alayna, and Lauren Terry; sisters, Phyllis Lingley, and Lois Denbow; brother, David Pressley and wife, Juanita, all of Lubec; as well as several nieces and nephews. Her joy in life was her grandchildren and she loved attending all of their sporting events or any other activities they were involved with . She was always so supportive and proud of them. Gee Gee was a loving and nurturing person to everyone who knew her. She will be remembered by her many friends and family for her generous heart, keen wit and happy spirit. Dec. 19, at Temple Christian Church, Lubec. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Lubec Elementary School Athletic Fund, 44 South St., Lubec, ME 04652. Arrangements are in care of McClure Family Funeral Services, Machias and Lubec. McNeil, 87, wife of the late William V. McNeil, died Dec. 15, 2013, at a Bangor hospital surrounded by her children after a brief illness. She was born Oct. 12, 1926, in Bangor, the daughter of Frank J. and Mary (Dunn) Guite. Teresa was a lifelong communicant of St. John Catholic Church. She attended St. John School and was a graduate of John Bapst High School. She was employed at the Garland St. Pharmacy, Viner Shoe Company and the American Heart Association. She was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, great grandmother and friend and was very involved in the lives of her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. She is survived by two children, Joseph L. McNeil and his wife, Sharon, of Bangor and Mary Lou Armes and her husband, William, of Brewer; three grandchildren, Travis Armes of Shirley, Mass., Joseph E. and Brooke O. She was predeceased by her siblings, Sr. Mary Fulgentia Guite, Marguerite Kearney, Laura Murray, Edmund and Francis Guite and William Collins. Tuesday, Dec. 17, at Kiley Foley Funeral Service, 299 Union St., Bangor. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at St. Paul the Apostle Parish, St. John Catholic Church, York St., Bangor, with the Rev. Frank J. Murray, Teresa nephew, presiding. Box 1749, Bangor, ME 04402 1749. Montcalm died Dec. 13, 2013, at an MDI health care facility. She was born in Moravia, Iowa, the daughter of William C. and Fern S. (Armstrong) Main. Margaret and her late husband, Col. Roger Montcalm were married in 1956. They lived in Germany for many years along with their daughter, Elizabeth. They enjoyed traveling all over Europe. When they moved to Maryland, Margaret became the Clerk at the Prince George County Courthouse. She worked there for over 25 years. Upon her retirement she and Roger moved to Southwest Harbor. Margaret was active in the Eastern Star, Irene Chapter No. 97 and the Daughters of the American Revolution. Margaret is survived by her daughter, Elizabeth Montcalm Smith and husband, Charles C.; a granddaughter, Katherine M. Smith, all of Kensington, Md.; two sisters, Christine Proudfort and husband, Max, of Twenty Nine Palms, Calif., and Madeleine Obermeyer and husband, Frank, of San Antonio; and special friends, Wally and Denise Heinbach, of Pennsylvania. She was predeceased in 1988 by her husband of 32 years, Col. Roger Montcalm. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at Jordan Fernald, 1139 Main St., Mount Desert. Interment will be at Arlington National Cemetery. Those who desire may make contributions in Margaret memory to the Daughter of the American Revolution, Mount Desert Isle Chapter, Chapter Regent, 49 Ledgelawn Ave., Bar Harbor, ME 04609. 13, 2013. He was born Dec. 11, 1931, in Sherman Mills, the son of Ranie and Rita Morrow. Army during the Korean War conflict. He married Maxine Raymond of Millinocket in 1955. Shortly after, they moved to Boston where Ken pursued his love of music, graduating from the prestigious Berkeley School of Music. Excelling in flute, clarinet and sax, he had the honor of meeting and jamming with Duke Ellington. Ken and Maxine returned to Millinocket where he began his 31 year career with the postal service, retiring in 1987. While working full time, he completely remodeled their home, an accomplishment he was most proud of. From spring to late fall Ken and Maxine could be seen spending many hours enjoying their porch. Self taught in the art of veneering, he created numerous intricate marquetry items. In addition to music, he enjoyed gardening, reading, and fishing, particularly his many trips to Slaughter Pond. Throughout his life, in whatever peaked his interest, he would fully immerse himself and attain incredible proficiency. Ken is survived by his wife, Maxine; daughter, Cynthia Hodge and husband, Stephen; daughter, Suzanne Sirois and husband, Roland; grandchildren, Shannon Sirois, Christopher and David Hodge; brother, Eldon Morrow; and many special relatives. He also leaves behind his beloved cat, Wesley. A graveside service with military honors will be held in the spring. Memorial contributions may be made to The Activity Fund at Katahdin Healthcare, 22 Walnut St., Millinocket, ME 04462. 13, 2013, at a Bangor health care facility surrounded by her loving family. Betty was born March 13, 1922, in Brewer, the daughter of Raymond W. and Charlotte E. (Hawes) Greene. Betty was a 41 year member and past Matron of the Star in the East Chapter No. 17 and a Grand Representative from Maine to Missouri. She was a faithful and active member of the Hampden Highlands United Methodist Church. Betty will be remembered as a loving mother, sister, aunt, and friend. Betty is survived by her son, John Tenney Jr. and wife, Kendra, of Eddington; her sister, Margaret Estelle Tenney of Hampden; and several brothers in law, sisters in law, nieces, nephews, and friends. Betty was predeceased by her husband, John; an infant son; a brother, Raymond Greene; and brother in law, Herbert Tenney. In keeping with Betty wishes, interment will be private at Mount Hope Cemetery, Bangor. Box 23, Hampden, ME 04444. Arrangements entrusted to Hampden Gilpatrick Funeral Home, 45 Western Ave., Hampden. 11, 2013, was many things throughout his life. He was a husband, a father, a brother, and a grandfather. He was a man of God, never overlooking his faith. He was a friend to many, and an inspiration to all. Ronny had a lot of love in his heart, and he never hesitated to share that love with all people in his life. Through all of his life experiences, through everything he was and all the relationships he held so dear, there was one phrase that Ronald Walden lived by, a phrase that sums up his life in the colorful manner he so desired: ILTICOTL I Like To Color Outside The Lines. Ronald Walden, that ol fuddy duddy, was a man of family, love, and faith. That is how he will be remembered: By his family and friends, with love, in faith. A memorial service will be held in the spring of 2014 in Greenville. The date has yet to be determined. Contributions may be made in his name to Good Will Hinckley School, which held a special place in Ronald heart or the Greenville Junction United Methodist Church Steeple Fund. Arrangements by Crosby Neal, Guilford. 11, 2013, as a result of an accident. Jesse was born March 20, 1983, in Bangor, daughter of Donald and Victoria (Sockabasin) Boston Jr. She graduated from St. Stephen High School, class of 2001, and attended the University of Maine at Orono. Census and for jewelry stores in Lincoln and Waterville until attending Northeast Technical Institute in Bangor where she earned her CDL to drive truck. Bouchard. Jesse loved the outdoors and enjoyed hunting, fishing, camping, cooking, photography, and was an amazing artist. Her most cherished times were spent with her son, Weston. Jesse is survived by her husband, Jason Walton of Indian Township; her beloved son, Weston Morgan Bailey of Grand Lake Stream; mother and father, Vickey and Donald Boston Jr.; paternal grandmother, Ruth Boston of South Berwick; three sisters, Shannon Ball of New Hampshire, Christine Cooper of South Paris, and Jennifer Boston of New Hampshire; three brothers, Roy Dana III of Indian Township, Donald Boston III and his wife, Veronica, of Fort Myers, Fla., and Philip Boston of Indian Township; aunts, Cindy, Sylvia, Nora, Janice, Debbie, Gail, Lori, Karen, and June; uncles, Mark, Gene, and her special uncle and hunting buddy, Richard; many nieces and nephews; numerous friends; and faithful four legged companions, Baxter, Brooke, and Fat Cat. Monday, Dec. 16, by Father Rob Lupo, at St. Anne Mission, Peter Dana Point. Burial will follow at the Tribal Cemetery. 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